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Eberhard Weber recordings

Discussion in 'Contemporary Jazz and Beyond' started by Rudy, Jun 4, 2015.

  1. Rudy

    Rudy ♪♫♪♫♫♪♪♫♪♪ Staff Member

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    Of note in the Detroit Jazz Festival lineup is a new work by Pat Metheny, composed in tribute to bassist Eberhard Weber. Fans of Metheny's earliest albums will note that Weber was featured on Pat's Watercolors album, which I would say is the most ECM-like of his recordings.

    Over the past few years, I've been listening to a few of Weber's ECM albums--Silent Feet, Fluid Rustle and Later That Evening. (I mean, seriously, who can resist an album with a track named "Death in the Carwash"? :laugh: ) Fluid Rustle certainly has some interesting vocal parts to it, eerie at times.

    I recall reading that Weber had suffered a massive stroke in 2007, and hasn't played bass since. Fortunately his spirits seem to be up, and he still released an album in 2013 called Résumé, which featured new works he built around existing interlude solos he had performed while on tour backing other musicians.

    Are there other Eberhard Weber albums anyone could recommend? I do have Yellow Fields, Pendulum and Little Movements which I have not yet given much of a listen to. But if there is something good I'm missing, by all means leave a note here.
     
  2. Rudy

    Rudy ♪♫♪♫♫♪♪♫♪♪ Staff Member

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    Pendulum is a "solo" recording, in that Weber has multitracked his bass to create an almost orchestral work, layering many parts to create a background. Quite interesting.

    There is an interesting interview posted at AAJ. Weber talks about his stroke and not being able to play the bass, yet still has a positive outlook for the future. It's a bit lengthy, but a nice read.

    http://www.allaboutjazz.com/eberhar...atism-eberhard-weber-by-john-kelman.php?&pg=1
     

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